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Sayaka Toda Solo Exhibition

“Adding Canna Flowers to Tokyo”

▼OPENING RECEPTION

July 6th (Saturday), 2024, 17:00-18:00

■Period

July 6th (Saturday), 2024 - August 3rd (Saturday), 2024

Wed - Sat 13:00-18:00 

(closed on Suns, Mon, Tue, and National Holidays)

■Venue

KANA KAWANISHI PHOTOGRAPHY

2-7-5-5F, Nishiazabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0031

▼TALK EVENT

Date & Time:

Venue:

Speakers:

August 1 (Thursday), 2024 | 18:00-19:30

KANA KAWANISHI PHOTOGRAPHY

Sayaka Toda (artist) × Kenji Takazawa (photo critic) × Naha Kanie (poet)

admission free | no reservation required

*Kindly note the talk will be held in Japanese language only.

Tokyo Canna Project #1 [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm

©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

KANA KAWANISHI PHOTOGRAPHY is pleased to present “Adding Canna Flowers to Tokyo,” a solo exhibition by Sayaka Toda starting  Saturday, July 6th, 2024.

Sayaka Toda has been attracting attention as a painter who connotes an implicit world of beauty and disfigurement, which are inextricably linked. She is an artist who has been attracting attention for her expressive ability, which is universal regardless of medium, including solo exhibitions of only photographic expression and installations combining photography, painting, sculpture, plants, and other media. In 2024, she was selected for “TOKAS-Emerging 2024,” where her installations that transcend time and space have received high acclaim.

This exhibition, “Adding Canna Flowers to Tokyo,” was inspired by Toda’s discovery of the deep history of the canna flower as a “symbol of peace,” which she had chosen as the subject for her first solo photography exhibition. On August 6, 1945, Hiroshima turned into a scorched wasteland in an instant by the world’s first atomic bomb, it was said that “no grass or trees would grow in Hiroshima for the next 75 years.” However, a single canna flower soon bloomed near the epicenter, giving people hope for life. Learning this fact during her residency, Toda has since begun subtly placing canna flowers around the city in a guerrilla manner and documenting them as photographic works.

At first glance, the subject of “flowers” may seem unrelated to the social context, but how they thoroughly live their lives quietly suggests how they create their own stories, depending on their place and era. We cordially invite all to this exhibition by Sayaka Toda, the painter who uses diverse mediums to express her worldview.

"Tokyo Canna Project #2" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #2" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

"Tokyo Canna Project #3" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #3" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

"Tokyo Canna Project #4" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #4" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

"Tokyo Canna Project #5" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #5" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

"Tokyo Canna Project #6" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #6" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

"Tokyo Canna Project #7" [referential work]

"Tokyo Canna Project #7" [referential work]

2023 | type c print | 420 × 297 mm | ©︎ Sayaka Toda, courtesy KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY

Artist Statement

Adding flowers of peace to the city. 

In the summer of 1945, about a month after Hiroshima was scorched to the ground by the atomic bombing, 

it was said that "no grass or trees would grow for the next 75 years," 

yet a canna flower bloomed not far from the hypocenter. 

One photograph of the canna blooming on the scorched earth encouraged people and became a source of hope and a symbol of people's desire for peace. 

 

I walked the streets of Tokyo with a canna flower and recorded the ever-changing scenery, 

with the mighty blooming canna lurking in the landscape. 

Listening to the endless sadness, cries, and despair and thinking of my beloved friends, 

I hold my small demonstration of peace in my way.

Sayaka Toda

Artist Profile

Sayaka Toda was born in 1988 in Saitama, Japan. She completed her M.F.A. at Joshibi University of Art and Design, Graduate School of Art and Design, Fine Arts Course, Painting in 2012.

Her major solo exhibitions include ​TOKAS-Emerging 2024 “Echoes of the Unspoken: The Silent Voices of the Vanishing” (2024, Tokyo Arts and Space Hongo, Tokyo), “CHABANA-RAISAN” (2024, Art Space Fukujuen, Kyoto), ​​“Monster” (2024, Gallery 10 [TOH], Tokyo),“Lying in the Land of Overgrown Weeds” (2023, KANA KAWANISHI GALLERY, Tokyo), “The glitter of the shadow and color of the light” (2023, GALLERY MERROW, Tokyo), “Across the Sea, or Beyond the Night” (2021, KANA KAWANISHI PHOTOGRAPHY, Tokyo), “Where the beauty is” (2011, KINOSHO KIKAKU, Tokyo). Group exhibitions include “Sono Aida #COVID-19” (2020-, online exhibition), “Seeing the Unseen” (2016, Gallery Ohrin, Ibaraki, Japan), “Wonderful My Art” (2013, Kawaguchiko Museum of Art, Yamanashi, Japan), “TO THE FUTURE” (2012, Mizuma Action, Tokyo), and “The 31st Outstanding Rising Artists Exhibition in 2012 Presented by Sompo Japan Fine Art Foundation” (2012, Seiji Togo Memorial Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Museum of Art, Tokyo).

Major awards include “Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2010” Kazue Kobata Prize and “Shell Art Award” shortlist (2010).

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